Ultraviolet

Ultraviolet

Book - 2011
Average Rating:
5
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Almost seventeen-year-old Alison, who has synesthesia, finds herself in a psychiatric facility accused of killing a classmate whose body cannot be found.
Publisher: London : Orchard, 2011.
ISBN: 9781408312759
Characteristics: 407 p. ; 20 cm.

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AL_ERIKA Aug 08, 2016

The imagery and language used in this novel is so vivid that you too feel as if you can taste words, be swept away by a letter or number, know a person just by the letters in their name, be so overwhelmed by language you feel the true magic inherit in it. Alison is a gift of a heroine that you'll root for through every page. You'll want to steal her away and protect her from a world she is too gifted for. This novel is a gift and I cannot recommend it enough!

0Charlie Feb 22, 2016

I enjoyed most of this work - there is a nice slow build as the character comes to understand her condition, some interesting revelations about characters and memories, a harrowing feeling as she struggles to survive in the hospital. Unfortunately, I felt that the final secret did not match up to the realism of the rest of the story. A little disappointing.

d
DeltaQueen50
Aug 16, 2014

Although Ultraviolet has a unique plot line and is quite well written, I personally was much happier with the first half of the story. Still, I am definitely not part of the target audience for this book and I do think Ultraviolet would appeal to a younger, sci-fi minded audience.

t
tink05
Feb 07, 2014

This book started out good but then took an unlikely turn of events n2 an alien origin book. Wasn't expecting that.

y
ychi
Jun 26, 2012

This was the weirdest mash of sci-fi and paranormal. The blurb said "genre-bending", but I wouldn't exactly call it that; it's more like the various elements were almost the same, but didn't mesh perfectly. It actually didn't detract from the novel, though, because you could tell it was very ambitious, so you just went along with it.

The first half of Ultraviolet is somewhat predictable: protag wakes up in hospital, gets committed to crazy ward, spends a third of time trying to get out. It's a good thing that the murder of Victoria throws things for a loop. The clash of Alison's memories with what the world tells her makes for a good atmosphere in the ward, and the friends and not-so-friends she makes also help the time she spends there realistic, and not too bleak in the "pity-me-I'm-stuck-here-without-anyone-on-my-side" way.

When the technology and real sci-fi aspects of the novel kick in, the out-of-this-worldness (literally) may throw some readers for a loop who haven't been expecting such hard-and-fast science, though Alison's synesthesia and subtle powers do set up the stage. The romance is deep, almost lush, and I'd call it intense -- but not in the way where 16-year-olds find their soul mate. It's a mature romance, which is unusual for YA but a wonderful change. It also helps the reader get more connected with Alison, since previously she's focused on getting out of the ward and obsessing over Tori's death.

Watch out for the ending -- it's bittersweet, and if you enjoy the all's-well-that-ends-well kind of story... I still think you should read this. It's thought-provoking and a refreshing deviation from all the paranormal out there.

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