The Accidental Feminist

The Accidental Feminist

How Elizabeth Taylor Raised Our Consciousness and We Were Too Distracted by Her Beauty to Notice

Book - 2012
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Movie stars build their roles into brands--and the Taylor brand is startlingly feminist. In her breakout film, "National Velvet" (1944), Taylor challenged gender discrimination, playing a jockey who had to pose as a male to race. Her next landmark, "A Place in the Sun" (1951), tackles abortion rights. In "Butterfield 8" (1960), she is censured not because she's a prostitute, but because she controls her own sexuality. And the classic "Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf?" (1966) depicts the anguish that befalls a woman when the only way she can express herself is through her husband's career and children. Taylor's personal life, too, is remarkable: financially autonomous, she supported her parents as a teenager. As an adult, she supported the right of people to love whomever they love--regardless of gender. Her legendary friendships with her gay male costars inspired her to become a major fundraiser for AIDS research in the 1980s, before the cause became fashionable.
Publisher: New York : Walker & Co., c2012.
ISBN: 9780802716699
0802716695
Branch Call Number: B 791.4302 TAY

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SK_Jarlone
Nov 16, 2015

Great book. This is how I discovered James Dean, Taylor's research concerning AIDS, and some really cool movies like Giant.

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